I’m new to this. How do I help realize racial justice?

George Floyd. Breonna Taylor. Ahmaud Arbery.

As we mourn these recent losses, we’re also coming to terms with our nation’s continued history of racism. We’re asking ourselves uncomfortable questions. We’re trying to understand our place in the racial justice movement.

It’s not an easy journey, but it’s an important one—and it’s one we can take, together.

But where to get started? We’ve pulled together some resources that can help us all better understand systemic racism, recognize white privilege, speak to children about race and racism, and serve as powerful allies.

It’s time to open our eyes, our ears, and our hearts.

– Dean

Understanding systemic racism

In order to realize racial justice, it’s critically important that we first understand our nation’s long history of racial discrimination, targeted disenfranchisement, and de facto laws that originated during times of slavery and the Jim Crow era—and that still exist in many of our institutions today.

These resources can serve as an important launching point for exploration, providing us with the knowledge necessary to begin advocating for real systematic change.

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Books

Documentaries

Films & Mini-Series

Podcasts

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Young girls delivering donations to South Minneapolis.

How to talk about racism and race with children

We all know racism is learned. And, all of us can have a powerful impact simply by educating our kids and challenging them to think critically about racism and race in America.

It sure may seem like a daunting task, but we all know it’s a necessary one. In sharing our knowledge with the next generation, and continuing to instill values of equity and inclusion, we can create the just world we seek. 

Articles

Books

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Podcasts

Understanding white privilege is a justice superpower

Having white privilege doesn’t mean there’s been no struggle or hardship—many of us have faced hurdles in our lives, some seemingly insurmountable. What it does mean is we’ve had certain benefits given to us through systems of racial discrimination—systems that have been instilled in our society and institutions.

Whether we’re allies or not, understanding how we benefit, and how many of our societal norms are defined and reinforced by white people, leads to a common language and a path to a better tomorrow for all. By rethinking normalcy and understanding that what’s normal for the dominant paradigm can greatly disadvantage people of color and our indigenous populations, we see things as they are and can better make change, together.

Articles

Books

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How to be an ally

Being an ally is not an easy role. It takes knowledge, bravery, and consistency—never taking our eyes off the objectives and goals.

The good news? The same unearned power that comes with privilege can also be a force for good. Using this privilege to support anti-racist movements and Black communities can create the world we want to see.

This power carries responsibility—wield it well and it will make all the difference.

Articles

Books

Videos

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